An essay on crimes and punishment

The question is not whether the president revealed information that he, as commander-in-chief, is legally permitted to reveal. The question is whether he acted in a manner consistent with his oath of office and his duties under Article II to “faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States” and “preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States.” If the president, through wanton carelessness or severe misjudgment, undermined American national security, not by making a controversial decision on public policy, but by mishandling the nation’s most sensitive intelligence, then he abused his office in a manner that the Constitution empowered Congress to remedy through impeachment. Congress cannot undo the damage the president has already done, but the impeachment power is designed to address a situation in which an officeholder has demonstrated through his past actions that he can no longer act in the public trust.

An essay on crimes and punishment

an essay on crimes and punishment

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an essay on crimes and punishmentan essay on crimes and punishmentan essay on crimes and punishmentan essay on crimes and punishment